Articles Posted in New York Accident Lawyers

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Why will Dylan Farrow never be able to bring her father Woody Allen to court for allegedly sexually abusing her when she was 7-years-old?

Why is Bridie Farrell unable to press charges against Olympic speedskater and former US Speedskating President Andrew Gabel for allegedly abusing her when she was 15?

Both of these men are protected by statutes of limitations.
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Manhattan landlord Steve Croman used intimidation and harassment to force “countless working-class and low-income families out of their longtime homes,” alleges the office of New York State attorney general Eric T. Schneiderman.

Over the course of a 25-year career in real estate, Croman purchased over 140 apartment buildings, many of them inhabited by rent-stabilized tenants whom he referred to as “targets,” and systematically bought them out to raise rent. His buyout scheme was highly effective, with most of his buildings cleared of its old tenants within just a few years.

Croman has been widely known for his slimy behavior for years now. Attorney general Scheiderman has dubbed him the “Bernie Madoff of landlords,” and the Village Voice referred to Croman as “The Repeat Offender” when he ranked 8th in the city’s Worst Landlords list in 2014.
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“I’m not here looking for a quick buck,” says 39-year-old Michael DeSantis, who as a child was raped by many of the priests in his Colonie, NY parish. “I don’t want your dirty money. All I’m asking for is a day in court.”

Like many underage victims of sexual assault, Mr. DeSantis’ feelings of fear and shame kept him from talking about his experiences until years later. However, the statute of limitations in New York made it impossible for him to take on his rapists in civil or criminal court after he turned 23.

“I said, ‘Huh? What do you mean? You’re kidding me!’” Mr. DeSantis said of the day he learned from Albany prosecutors that he would be unable to hold the church or the priests accountable. “I mean, these guys are just going to get away with it?”
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Pastor Brian Williams’ pattern of sexual violence against teenage girls was glaring to anyone that knew the facts.

When the mother of teenager April Jokela complained that the Ohio pastor had attempted to reach his hand into April’s pants in the early 1990s, church officials asked her to “keep this quiet to protect our brother.”

When another teenager came forward in the early 2000s to report that Pastor Williams told her “he could probably get away with having sex with me right then and there in his office,” she too was ignored.
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New Yorkers are no strangers to the aggravations of widespread e-bike use. Up until last year, pedestrians frequently dealt with e-bikes taking up the sidewalk, while many drivers experienced e-bike riders heading the wrong way into traffic.

That’s why, after over a decade of virtually unenforceable legislation, New York finally cracked down on e-bike use.

In July of last year, the NYPD was given orders to hand out tickets to e-bike riders with fines up to $500. Between July and October, police issued over 685 summonses for e-bike and motorized scooter use, and seized 96 vehicles.
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While big cities like New York, Los Angeles and Chicago are often associated with the threat of violent crime, none of these cities made this year’s Most Dangerous Cities List.

The list, compiled by neighborhood search engine NeighborhoodScout, is based on the most up-to-date reports of violent crimes from all law enforcement agencies. Violent crimes include “murder, rape, armed robbery, and aggravated assault,” meaning that theft and burglary data is not taken into consideration.

Small and mid-sized cities dominate the 2016 list. With a population of 680,250, Detroit, MI–the third most dangerous city in America–is one of the largest cities included. Detroit averages just over 20 violent crimes per 1000 residents every year. For comparison, the national average is 3.72.
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Nobody wants to hear that the money they donated to a charitable cause has gone to waste, but that happened on a massive scale last spring when the Federal Trade Commission charged 4 cancer charities with fraud.

The Breast Cancer Society Inc., the Children’s Cancer Fund of America, Inc., Cancer Support Services Inc., and the Cancer Fund of America, Inc. allegedly spent over $187 million on Disney World trips, luxury cruises, concert tickets, and college tuition for board members’ friends and family.

Less than 3% of the money these organizations raised went to cancer patients and research.
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Bill Cosby. Bryan Singer. Dominique Strauss-Kahn.

Now we can add Bikram Choudhury, founder of Bikram Yoga, to the growing list of powerful men thrust into the spotlight in recent years for allegations of sexual abuse.

The 69-year-old hot yoga guru, whose followers include former presidents Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton, as well as celebrities Madonna, Jennifer Aniston and George Clooney, has been accused of raping 5 women, and sexually harassing several more.
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Debbie Brenner was in her 40s when she began the 14-month surgical technician curriculum at Lamson College. The program would cost her over $24,000, but it seemed well worth the cost considering the school’s promise that Debbie would have no trouble finding a job after graduation.

Lamson College sales reps assured Debbie that the school would set her up with an externship at a local hospital or surgical center, and that starting salaries for Lamson graduates ranged from $15 to $26 per hour. They urged Debbie to enroll quickly in order to secure a highly coveted place in the competitive program.

Debbie found early evidence that the program was not all it was cracked up to be. Many professors had little experience in the field of surgical tech, and school equipment was often outdated, broken or missing.
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Workers’ compensation programs were adopted in the US roughly a hundred years ago to protect employees injured in the workplace. These programs were designed to minimize unnecessary litigation, guaranteeing injured workers medical coverage regardless of fault, and in exchange, limiting employers’ losses to certain standards for lost wages, medical treatment, and rehabilitation services. Now, a Texas lawyer is working to reverse a century of progress by dismantling the workers’ compensation system.
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