Articles Posted in Personal Injury

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Manhattan landlord Steve Croman used intimidation and harassment to force “countless working-class and low-income families out of their longtime homes,” alleges the office of New York State attorney general Eric T. Schneiderman.

Over the course of a 25-year career in real estate, Croman purchased over 140 apartment buildings, many of them inhabited by rent-stabilized tenants whom he referred to as “targets,” and systematically bought them out to raise rent. His buyout scheme was highly effective, with most of his buildings cleared of its old tenants within just a few years.

Croman has been widely known for his slimy behavior for years now. Attorney general Scheiderman has dubbed him the “Bernie Madoff of landlords,” and the Village Voice referred to Croman as “The Repeat Offender” when he ranked 8th in the city’s Worst Landlords list in 2014.
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Earlier this year, after pleading guilty to conspiring to kill Americans in the 9/11 attacks, al Qaeda member Zacarias Moussaoui admitted that his activities were funded in part by members of the Saudi royal family.

This was not the first time the Saudi government has been tied to terrorism in America.

Leaked information from the censored 28 pages of the 9/11 congressional inquiry report show a number of phone calls between the Saudi embassy and hijackers’ handlers leading up the attacks, as well as a transfer of $130,000 from the family of former Saudi Ambassador Prince Bandar to the handler of another hijacker.
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Every year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention compiles a list of the most common causes of death among Americans. This list is significant—it helps raise public awareness about particular health risks and it steers national research priorities. It is also inaccurate.

The CDC bases its rankings on data derived from death certificates, which assign an International Classification of Disease code to each cause of death. However, to this day there is no ICD code that corresponds to medical errors.

This omission is no accident. Preventable medical errors have been known by the healthcare industry to be a leading cause of death since at least 1999, when the Institute of Medicine referred to the 98,000 annual deaths they estimated were due to errors as an “epidemic.”
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Nearly 10,000 Americans died from drunk driving collisions in 2014.

Statistics show that alcohol is a factor in over 30% of driving fatalities. Drunk drivers tend to be young—26 to 29 is the highest risk age range—and male—men arrested for drunk driving outnumber women 3 to 1.

Now, thanks to a survey published by CarInsuranceComparison.com, we know which states have the highest occurrences of drunk driving.

The survey gave each state a ranking that takes into account drunk driving fatalities, DUI arrests and penalties, and the laws in place to deter drunk driving, among other factors.
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Over 80 New York drinking water systems contain lead levels over the federal action limit, say Environmental Protection Agency records. The largest of these systems, located in Tarrytown, NY, supplies water to over 11,000 people. 16 of the systems supply schools and day care centers.

New York has become more diligent in its testing in the wake of the catastrophic findings in Flint, MI and Newark, NJ.

In September of last year, the proportion of children with elevated lead levels in Flint was found to have doubled since the city switched water sources in 2014. Because the effects of lead poisoning can sometimes take years to become apparent, Michigan chief medical executive Eden Wells has recommended considering all 8,657 children in Flint under the age of 6 exposed, “regardless of what their blood level is on Jan. 11.” Because of the mass exposure to lead by the city’s children, Flint mayor Dayne Walling anticipates a greater need for mental health services and special education in years to come.
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“I’m not here looking for a quick buck,” says 39-year-old Michael DeSantis, who as a child was raped by many of the priests in his Colonie, NY parish. “I don’t want your dirty money. All I’m asking for is a day in court.”

Like many underage victims of sexual assault, Mr. DeSantis’ feelings of fear and shame kept him from talking about his experiences until years later. However, the statute of limitations in New York made it impossible for him to take on his rapists in civil or criminal court after he turned 23.

“I said, ‘Huh? What do you mean? You’re kidding me!’” Mr. DeSantis said of the day he learned from Albany prosecutors that he would be unable to hold the church or the priests accountable. “I mean, these guys are just going to get away with it?”
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Pastor Brian Williams’ pattern of sexual violence against teenage girls was glaring to anyone that knew the facts.

When the mother of teenager April Jokela complained that the Ohio pastor had attempted to reach his hand into April’s pants in the early 1990s, church officials asked her to “keep this quiet to protect our brother.”

When another teenager came forward in the early 2000s to report that Pastor Williams told her “he could probably get away with having sex with me right then and there in his office,” she too was ignored.
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Nearly 15 years after the tragedy, the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund has finally sent out its first batch of full compensation checks to families that suffered economic losses due to 9/11-related health problems.

The $233.4 million that went out to survivors and first responders this month is a result of Congress’ decision late last year to re-authorize the James L. Zadroga 9/11 Health & Compensation Act.

In addition to paying out $233.4 million on these early Zadroga claims, the re-authorization also pushed back the deadline to submit new claims until December 2020. This is great news for cancer victims who have not yet filed claims with the Victim Compensation Fund.
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26 Chinatown bus companies were shut down by transportation regulators in May 2012 for employing unqualified drivers and operating buses that were either not regularly inspected or in need of repair. The crackdown on companies that included Apex Bus, Inc., New Century Travel, Inc. and 1-95 Coach, Inc., was in response to multiple fatal bus crashes the year before, which left 17 dead and many more injured.

If you thought that mass shutdown meant the end of dangerous Chinatown bus companies, you were sadly mistaken.

Last week, police arrested 8 bus carrier operators that, along with 6 other individuals still at large, have been charged with impeding a U.S. Department of Transportation investigation as well as fraud.
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In 2014, automakers set a new record for the number of car models recalled because of safety defects. In 2015, they obliterated that record.

Nearly 900 models were recalled last year, translating to 64 million recalled cars in the US.

More frightening than this, however, is the fact that many drivers never get their cars repaired after a recall is announced.

There are 47 million unrepaired vehicles with open recalls throughout the country, reports a new study by Carfax. That means that roughly 1 in 5 cars on the road are currently in need of serious repairs.
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