Articles Tagged with Medical Professional Negligence

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New bills spearheaded by the GOP could make it harder for victims of medical negligence and medical malpractice to secure fair compensation for their injuries. As part of the House Republicans’ efforts to replace President Obama’s Affordable Care Act, these bills would place new limits on lawsuits that involve doctors, hospitals, and nursing homes, and would likely be most harmful to low-income and elderly victims.

White House press secretary Sean Spicer claims the bills will lessen “frivolous lawsuits that unnecessarily drive up health care costs.” This idea–that health care would be affordable if only the government could curb all of the “frivolous” lawsuits attacking good doctors hospitals–is not only false, it is also dangerous. GOP Republicans have made countless attempts to limit the rights of medical negligence victims, but have failed consistently because the rights of victims to seek justice in the court system is guaranteed in the US Constitution.
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Dr. David H. Newman, accused of groping emergency room patients.[/caption]In a speech to medical students at the University of Virginia, former clinical research head at Mount Sinai Hospital and ethics lecturer Dr. David Newman said, “[Patients] believe in us. They have faith in us, it’s almost religious. We need to use that privilege in a way that will better their care.”

In March, Dr. Newman was accused of sexually abusing four of his patients, one of whom claims the doctor ejaculated on her while she was sedated. He now faces up to 7 years in prison.

Dr. David Mata was named Oregon Family Doctor of the Year in 1995. He has since been accused of 140 counts of sexual abuse, 6 of which he has pleaded guilty to. Dr. Mata was charged with 5 years probation, which he served at home. He is now eligible to reapply for his medical license.
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Every year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention compiles a list of the most common causes of death among Americans. This list is significant—it helps raise public awareness about particular health risks and it steers national research priorities. It is also inaccurate.

The CDC bases its rankings on data derived from death certificates, which assign an International Classification of Disease code to each cause of death. However, to this day there is no ICD code that corresponds to medical errors.

This omission is no accident. Preventable medical errors have been known by the healthcare industry to be a leading cause of death since at least 1999, when the Institute of Medicine referred to the 98,000 annual deaths they estimated were due to errors as an “epidemic.”
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Every year, our office receives calls from potential clients that checked into hospitals for routine surgical procedures, and walked out with devastating bacterial infections. Some of these infections result in lost limbs. Others prove deadly. These cases are extremely difficult to prosecute because hospitals frequently use the defense that infections can spread any place that sick and elderly patients reside.
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Lake Forest, CA teenager Kevin Barr hasn’t had it easy. Kevin was born 25 weeks premature, and suffered throughout his life from a seizure disorder as well as cerebral palsy.

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“I think he’s guilty of the most cruel thing that a human being can do to another human being.”

That’s what Dr. Soe Maunglay has to say about his boss, Michigan oncologist Farid Fata, M.D., who on July 10th was sentenced to serve 45 years in prison and forfeit $17.6 million.

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Eliza Jennings resided at The Terrace Nursing & Rehabilitation Center in Berea, KY from 2004 until her death in 2009, and during that time she endured unimaginable living conditions and neglect by the facility’s staff.

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New York victims of medical negligence suffered a catastrophic blow this past Thursday, as state legislators refused to pass a “Date of Discovery” bill that has already been approved by 44 other states. “Lavern’s Law,” named after one particularly tragic medical negligence victim, would have corrected an oversight in the law as it applies to victims of medical negligence and misdiagnosis treated at New York hospitals.

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We wrote about the Joan Rivers tragedy shortly after the 81-year-old comedienne’s death during an endoscopy in September of last year. The Manhattan clinic that treated comedian Joan Rivers before her death allegedly made a number of serious mistakes, including failing to identify deteriorating vital signs, and providing timely intervention, according to a report released Monday.

The report, which was published by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), included a list of major error committed by the clinic:

— Failing to identify deteriorating vital signs and provide timely intervention;

— Failing to record Rivers’ weight, prior to the administration of medication for sedation;

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In the wake of Joan Rivers’ passing we have seen an outpouring of love and support from millions of fans all around the world. With the sudden and unexpected circumstances of her death this past Thursday, it’s impossible to ignore the question of what could have caused such a rapid decline in health during a routine medical procedure.

On the morning of August 28th, Rivers visited the Yorkville Endoscopy Center on the Upper East Side for a diagnostic throat procedure. At 9:39 that morning, someone from the medical clinic made a 911 call after Rivers had gone into cardiac arrest. By the time she arrived at Mount Sinai Hospital, Rivers was in near death condition and required life support.

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